Friday, September 2, 2011

haiku my heart ~ eve of destruction


Blue sky and koi pond



Change to gold chrysanthemums--



Eve of destruction~


Haiku my heart is the vision of Rebecca Brooks at "recuerda mi corazon." If you would like to participate, just post your haiku on Fridays with an accompanying photo on your blog and link back to recuerda mi corazon.

22 comments:

  1. oh, dear, i HATE to lose trees... "eve of destruction," indeed!

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  2. hope
    there was no koi pond
    under that fallen tree...

    :-\


    yikeees!

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  3. Hello Margaret,
    I love the images of Kimonos and I have been trying to decipher the transformation that you are referring to here from Koi pond and blue sky to golden chrysanthemums to the Eve of destruction.
    I came up with this first because I was looking at your felled tree. http://scholarlykitchen.sspnet.org/2011/08/29/the-eve-of-destruction-now-on-youtube/ and then I listened to Barry McGuire's Eve of Destruction. So now I am a bit confused but still trying.
    xoxo,
    Noelle

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  4. Lovely kimonos. Nature is in harmony even though it seems lopsided at times.

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  5. Lovely imagery of a blue sky and a Koi pond as Autumn colors spread all around in gold, rust and crimson hues. Beautiful.... but the sad fallen tree ?? Did it destroy the peace and tranquility?? Strange are natures way and it is impossible to change its laws!!

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  6. Wonderful images with a scary thought! Keeping us on our toes I see! Love Di ♥

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  7. Hi Phivos! Thank you! (Were you just doing a review of Paris?)

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  8. Hi Leslie! Yes, Hurricane Irene just cut a swath through here, and we lost that tree. There was flooding everywhere, and we lost our power for four days! Sometimes mother earth's pruning feels a little out of order, but I'm sure it eventually shows a bigger plan...

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  9. Stunning imagery in words and photos, Margaret. The whole creation evokes a feeling that moves from complacency to terror!

    No Windmill Here!

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  10. Hi somepinkflowers~ Good point! The koi pond kimono was to represent summer transitioning into fall--the chrysanthemum kimono--which will still be golden and sublime and transform into winter, but "nature's pruning" in the form of Hurricane Irene made it feel we were on the eve of destruction and not Indian summer! My thought is for this tree to be replaced by another tree in the spring, and so it goes...

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  11. Hi Noelle~ That was sweet of you to put so much thought and effort into wanting to connect with my haiku! I had seen several weeks ago at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY an exhibit entitled "A Sensitivity to the Seasons: Summer and Autumn in Japanese Art." I thought the seasonal kimonos would allude to the seasonal emphasis in haiku. 1) Blue sky and koi pond (of summer). This would be a transition to the fall kimono: 2) Change to gold chrysanthemums-- The final line would be the emotionally-charged unusual ending: 3) Eve of destruction~ because just as summer was transforming into fall, Hurricane Irene wreaked her havoc and devastated everything in her path. I was just thinking of the title of the song and not the anti-war song (that's another battle). When we think of all the natural disasters these past two years, could we be contributing to destruct our planet? I think the answer is nature will do what she has to do to maintain harmony and alignment. I liked the article, by the way, about the demise of printed books and having an anthem! Maybe the anthem here is "Beautiful Mother Nature" by Ziggy Marley... Much love, Noelle~

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  12. Thanks Gemma~ Yes, I think the earth regulates itself to keep in balance. It thinks in terms of millions of years, so we don't always understand. However, it survives.

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  13. Thanks, Nanka~ Autumn is such a rich, golden season of harvest; however, our thoughts were thrown off by the devastation left by Hurricane Irene. Now I'm considering how to see that tree in a more positive light. Do you remember the children's book, The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein? Once the tree had fallen, its wood was made into a boat, fire wood, and the stump a seat for the old man. This--plus replanting a tree--would be a way to honor the tree, the earth.

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  14. Hi Diana! How are you? I was thinking that the hurricane represented the end of summer (they usually occur in September). It (Hurricane Irene) really was scary... You should be nice and strong by winter! Love, me

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  15. Thanks, mmt! Yes, there was complacency all through summer and fall in the soft, flat kimonos, but the challenge is to reconcile fear with positive, healing actions. That will my next haiku!

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  16. An apt haiku to reflect life itself.

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  17. More than the eve of destruction, the destruction itself, it seems. I'm sorry for the beautiful tree.

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  18. So sad when these beautiful giants fall...

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  19. Thanks, Lynne! Yes, that fallen tree reflects the final cycle of life. Love, me

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  20. Hi, Friko! The hurricane (Irene) that brought down this mature tree is said to have been the worst storm in 100 years! Love, me

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  21. Hi, Stephanie! A seedling will be planted in its footprint to start the cycle again... but it will take a long time to match the stature of this tree... Love, me

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